Telegenic

  • NEW YEAR'S ALIENATION by Matt Crowder

    BBC-bashing is of course a venerable and well-cherished sport for the British press. A recent example was the ‘furore’ over the Corporation’s overly-enthusiastic use of Gary Barlow, particularly in his performance in Gary Barlow’s Big Ben Bash (BBC1), whi
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  • DO I DO 'TELEVISION STUDIES'? by Brett Mills

    How many of us define ourselves as doing ‘Television Studies’, and state as such when asked by others what our field is? I ask this following an interesting discussion at the opening plenary at last week’s MeCCSA conference, brilliantly hosted by Bournemo
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  • MY MUM WAS A FEMINIST IN THE 1970s: RADICAL FEMINISM IN...

    In the introduction to their 2006 edited collection, Joanne Hollows and Rachel Moseley note that their own initial encounters with feminism were through popular culture, including television. As they explain, ‘it was feminism in popular culture that forme
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  • FEMINIST MUSINGS: HOW TO LIKE RIPPER STREET by Elke...

    There is something bizarrely compelling about watching something that you’ve been told you will disagree with. This is how I encountered Ripper Street which ended this week, apparently axed as a result of disappointing viewing figures when scheduled again
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  • CHANNEL 4 AND SCRIPTED COMEDY DEVELOPMENT: COMEDY WITH A...

    One of the questions I’ve had to answer in conducting my PhD research is how I’m going to define what I’m looking at when I research British Television Comedy. More specifically, because I’m conducting interviews with ‘comedy professionals’, how will I kn
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  • ITS NOT TV, ITS NETFLIX by William Proctor

    As a scholar of all things transmedia, the news that Netflix is teaming up with Marvel Comics to produce a series of shows based upon several comic book properties provides valuable insight into the way in which television is adapting to a shift in delive
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  • TELEVISION TRIBES by Helen Wheatley

    I was recently consulted by telecommunications company, TalkTalk, on what it called its ‘Television Tribes’ report. Along with TalkTalk, I worked on producing a detailed, long-form questionnaire conducted by telephone and online by the organisation OnePol
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  • BBC GOES STEAMPUNK: RIPPER STREET, PEAKY BLINDERS AND THE...

    With the 2014 centenary of the First World War already being trailed, the BBC’s move to a steampunk view of history is fascinating. Between them, Peaky Blinders, set in Birmingham 1920, and Ripper Street, set in the immediate aftermath of the Jack the Rip
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  • COLIN'S SANDWICH: REMEMBERING FORGOTTEN TELEVISION,...

    Starting work on the three year AHRC project ‘The History of Forgotten TV Drama in the UK’ at Royal Holloway has led me to think a lot about to what extent I remember television myself, and the reliability of my memory.
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  • THE RETURN OF THE UNDEAD: THE WALKING DEAD, IN THE FLESH...

    Horror is not a genre often traditionally associated with television, although as Helen Wheatley, Stacey Abbott and Lorna Jowett have pointed out television has a long history of telling horrific tales. It’s also not a genre with which I have much affinit
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