CST blog

  • WHAT IS TELEVISION? by Toby Miller

    What is television? I’ve been trying to answer this question by turning to the morning papers. That’s assuming the phrase ‘morning papers’ is not a homonymous typo for ‘mourning papers.’ The Global North is obsessed with pronouncing the end of the medium
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  • SPOILERS! by Simon Brown

    This month my nephew was among the many, many people who were enraged on 4th June when the free commuter newspaper Metro ran a full page spread about Sky Atlantic’s viewing figures which gave away what happened at the now infamous Game of Thrones Red Wed
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  • ON NOT WATCHING THE NEWS by Christine Geraghty

    One of the major revelations from media studies research came to me, long ago, via David Morley.
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  • TERROR, TORTURE, SOLDIER, SPY by Gary R. Edgerton

    When it comes to making sense of 9/11 and its aftermath, most Americans are still watching screens, looking for answers. We all share an obsessive need to look and listen carefully in the post-9/11 world. It is often impenetrable, filled with sudden and
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  • ADAPT OR DIE? NEW TECHNOLOGIES OF EFFICIENCY AND PRODUCTION...

    So the BBC has called time on its Digital Media Initiative (DMI), the project to create tapeless workflow and archive access: £98m in the hole for a software solution that can now be bought off the shelf for less than £1,000. The story points to some of t
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  • TV FUTURISM by Toby Miller

    Futuristic TV images are fun to look at, whether the sets are depicted in splendid isolation or with asinine human faces as accompaniment. I like to look back and think about what was once thought of as the future as well as forwards to what we imagine as
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  • SAY GOODNIGHT CLARA: LONDON WEEKEND TELEVISION'S NO -...

    I return for this blog to the topic of neglected historical British television comedy. In my last post, my focus was on the significance of female performers to the genre, with a retrospective of the comedy career of actress Penelope Keith. This time I
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  • BROADCHURCH - THE PLEASURES OF ORDINARY TELEVISION by...

    Forgive me for returning to Broadchurch so soon after John Ellis’s excellent account, written just as it finished. But I thought it was worth commenting on some of its other (largely textual) features before it slips away from view until the second series
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  • ON NOT WATCHING TV by Kim Akass

    It was with some horror that I realized I had put myself down to write a blog this week.
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  • THE BROADCHURCH CASE by John Ellis

    Last Monday, Britain invented television… all over again. A load of people watched the same programme at the same time, at the moment of first broadcast. At one point, 9.27 million people, 34.64% of the TV audience, was watching the final denouement of th
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